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The prison visitors centre is a single-storey building with a canted green copper roof and a glazed wall - described by the architect as a 'ripple-wall', which forms the principal part of the north facade.

The centre provides facilities for visitors - a cafe, WCs and lockers for storage.

The lockers are purpose-made into free-standing units which divide the area adjacent to the ripple-wall into five bays, with bench seating for visitors fixed round each bay. Vertical storey-height hopper windows articulate the ripplewall to reflect the bay divisions.

Each bay in the ripple-wall consists of 11 storey-height 250mm wide glazed slots framed by deep timber mullions which are skewed out from the sill at angles which range from 75degrees to 88degrees to achieve the ripple effect.

The bay structure comprises twelve skewed 290 x 22mm thick plywood mullions, screwed at the head to a 'ladder frame' of 75 x 50mm timber members, and at the base to a Western red cedar sill. To form the soffit, a 15mm cherry veneered ply sheet was cut to fit between the mullions and fixed to the underside of the ladder frame.

Instead of conventional glazing beads, each doubleglazed unit is secured between a pair of 15mm Western red cedar panels screwed to the sides of the ply mullions.

Panels on the outside of the glass are additionally sealed with a continuous adhesive bed-joint. Cedar cover beads are glued and screwed to the edges of the mullions to cover the cedar/ply/cedar joint.

A glazing sill is fixed between each pair of mullions.

It is stepped to allow the glass panel to rest against it, secured by a sill cover plate. The glazing sills and sill cover plates are made of cedar and screwed to the sub-sill.

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