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Working details A SUSPENDED STEEL STAIRCASE AND FABRIC SCREEN

BUILDING STUDY; LORD'S CRICKET GROUND

The grandstand is 100m long and consists of two tiers of seats and a row of private boxes with dining facilities. The lowest tier is formed of precast concrete; the upper tiers and boxes are formed of precast units supported by a steel framework. The roof is a delicate steel aerofoil suspended below a steel lattice truss.

A series of lifts and stairs gives access to upper tiers and boxes; they are located at the rear of the grandstand to avoid interfering with the view of the pitch. The stairs run from the back of the lowest tier to serve the two upper levels.

Planning regulations required the stairs to be screened to prevent neighbouring gardens from being overlooked. A series of fabric screens stretched between a steel framework of 114mm-diameter chss shields the gardens from view.

A service road runs directly below the staircases; they were required by fire regulations to be suspended above the road without support at ground level.

Each staircase is fixed to a steel support structure cantilevered from the steel frame of the lift shaft. The support structure comprises a series of 200 x 100mm rhs beams pinned to the lift shaft on one side and pinned to the tubular steel framework which supports the fabric screens on the other side. This framework is suspended by tie rods from the top of the lift shaft.

The treads and landings of the staircase are of folded steel chequerplate fully welded on each side to 20mm steel plate strings. They are connected to the support structure at landings.

The handrail is a 50mm-diameter steel chs fixed to stainless steel brackets set between tapered steel balusters which are galvanised and polyester powder coated; they are bolted to plates welded to the stair strings and support a balustrade of 6mm-diameter steel bar mesh panels.

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