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Working details - A frameless glass cube with a stone sill

Working details : House for an artist, Roche Court Munkenbeck + Marshall

The house is designed as a residence for visiting artists and a gallery for the exhibition in a domestic setting of small sculptures and works on paper.

The two-storey structure is relatively conventional; a blockwork-insulated cavity wall with a sand/cement render finish on the outside, and a steel-framed roof in the shape of a truncated pyramid with a central skylight.The roof is stabilised by a 150 x 150mm UB ring beam which runs at the eaves and acts as a lintel to the first-floor windows. 'Gutter clutter'at the eaves is concealed by a projecting ledge of 520 x 6mm-thick brushed stainlesssteel panels which also house downlighters.The panels are fixed to steel angles bolted back to the beam.

The floor-to-ceiling windows to the first floor living room/gallery can be screened by internal roller blinds and by external ledged and braced oak shutters.The window to the ground-floor bathroom is a projecting 500mm frameless glass cube which acts as an enclosure for delicate works of art; it rests on a 600mm-wide and 3mlong Wiltshire limestone sill which is a platform for small sculptures.An oak shutter adjacent to the cube can be opened to ventilate the bathroom.

The glass cube, framed with stainless-steel angles, is formed of 19mm toughened glass panels clamped in aluminium channels.At the corners, the glass edges are butt jointed with 10 x 10mm acrylic blocks adhesive-fixed between them to create ventilation gaps. The 30mmthick stone sill is supported by a series of gallows brackets concealed within the wall thickness and bolted to the foundations.Below the stone sill lies a shallow lightreflecting pool.

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