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Tony Fitzpatrick (1951-2003)

Tony Fitzpatrick, group board director of Arup and chairman of Arup's Americas division - and the man who will forever be remembered as 'the man who took the wobble out of the wobbly bridge'- died in a road accident on 26 July.

Fitzpatrick was born in London in 1951 to an English father and an Italian mother, and he spent a significant part of his early life in Florence. He studied engineering at Leeds University, graduating in 1972 with a first-class honours degree. The same year he joined Arup, where he was to spend his entire working life, having stints in Tehran (1975-78) and Hong Kong (1982-86) before becoming a director in 1986. In 1997 he became chairman of the Building Engineering Europe Division in 1997, and chairman of the Americas division in 2001.

His most high-profile role was as engineer in charge of the redesign of the vibration control of the Foster-Arup Millennium Bridge in London.

But his work there drew on experience gained on a wide range of complex structures including Foster's Hongkong and Shanghai Bank in Hong Kong, Jean Nouvel's Tour Sans Fin in Paris, Renzo Piano's London Bridge Tower and Foster's Baltic Exchange.Still to come is Rogers' Terminal 5 at Heathrow.

When asked what his favourite project was in a recent interview, Fitzpatrick replied: 'I have two, the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank and the Millennium Bridge. Both were fantastic learning experiences where I felt I made a real difference, and that is really important to me. These projects justified my decision to become an engineer, that my contribution to the environment has made the world a little better.'

Fitzpatrick was a fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering and the Institution of Civil Engineers, and was awarded a RIBA Honorary Fellowship in February 2002.

He is survived by his wife, Jan, and four children.

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