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The art of creativity and communication

interiors; and fit-outs

A year after communications agency fca! commissioned Bisset Adams to fit out its new offices in Baker Street, Central London, it acquired Kelly Weedon Shute and decided to move to larger premises in Wigmore Street. Once again it turned to Bisset Adams for a design that would satisfy the client’s requirements, as well as meeting the demands of a low budget and tight timetable.

 

The new offices are on the 1000m2 seventh floor of a 10-storey 1960s office building, recently refurbished by Sheppard Robson. Flooring in the reception area has been covered in reclaimed wooden floor tiles salvaged from the old glc headquarters. The long curving wall behind the reception desk is finished in burnished metal - an effect achieved by patterning stainless-steel panels with an angle-grinder, in a process which the architect says had ‘more in common with performance art than routine joinery’. The finished panels were rivetted to a supporting framework. The same burnished steel is used on the front of the beech-topped reception desk.

 

Beside the reception desk, a purple-sprayed pivoting door opens into the main conference room. Beyond it, a purple-painted storage wall fitted with slots for drawer units, shelving and cupboards snakes through the middle of an open-plan meetings area, separating a large central meetings table from smaller peripheral units. The same feature is repeated at the far end of the office.

 

The most artful element of the fit-out is the series of creative cells ‘parked’ like colourful caravans along one side of the main corridor, each highlighted in a different colour. Made from 3mm mdf and grg board, they were prefabricated and slotted together on site. Each cell has a curving outer wall with a window looking onto the corridor. Inside the cell, the curve forms a storage unit, light box and workspace. A recessed skirting board, made of faceted mirror strips, creates the illusion that the pods are floating above the floor. A row of aligned internal windows provides a visual link between the two-people teams at work in their separate pods.

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