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St Thomas' confirms classy shortlist for kids' hospital

Guys and St Thomas' has confirmed it has shortlisted five teams to build a new Children's Hospital, as revealed in the aj (21/10/99).

The new hospital will have 120 in-patient beds, a day-case unit and 20 paediatric intensive-care beds and is planned for completion in 2003. The teams are: kpf Cannon with Mott MacDonald; Anshen Dyer with Ove Arup and Partners; Skidmore Owings & Merrill with Buro Happold, David Hutchison; Michael Hopkins & Partners with rkw, Hoare Lea, and Buro Happold; and Alsop & Stormer/Whicheloe Macfarlane mdp with Anthony Hunt Associates. The riba-run competition includes Nicholas Grimshaw as adjudicator.

Baileys set to build on creamy theme bar concept Creamy liquor brand Baileys could be about to unleash a series of visitor centres, restaurants and bars themed around the drink and 'The Emerald Isle' after successfully completing an initial £11 million scheme - in Dublin.

The first building, called the Icon at the Baileys Centre, is situated at Leopardstown racetrack in the city to take advantage of busy racedays, but the company is hoping to push the centre as an attraction in its own right. And project director Peter O'Connor said the concept may be exportable to places such as London, New York or Barcelona.

Designed for £4.2 million by London-based visitor attraction specialists Sarner International within a shell by local practice Cantrell & Crowley, the Dublin Icon features a series of multi-level themed bars and restaurants and a small auditorium hosting a 12-minute laser show on 'Ireland, Dublin, and Baileys'.

The centre seats 650 people over 2,000m2 on five floors and includes 'scenes' based on Trinity College, a traditional 'Georgian' street scene, a snug and a working watermill-wheel and waterfall. It opened in April alongside a new pavilion and conference centre for the racecourse. It is '70 per cent accessible' for the disabled.

Sarner's project architect for Baileys, Tim Warner, is about to set up a new practice in London called Origin Architects. Warner, formerly of Terry Farrell and Partners, is to go after housing, transport and specialist interiors work, while his partner, Nick Hinge, will concentrate on retail and leisure. Hinge and Warner both trained at Canterbury.

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