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Keep your sex life to yourself!

RECRUITMENT - JOBSPOT

An interest in reading, cooking and keeping fit will hardly fascinate potential employers, so some of us are tempted to embellish - or just be overly honest - when addressing that part of our CV headed 'interests'.

Remember there are worse things than being average and a little dull. Religion is tricky.

Believing is fine, practising of course is alright, but do be careful not to give the impression that you may be proselytising in the office.

Don't be scary. Your abiding interest in Satanic sex may give you a certain elan, but it could also make female members of staff wary of being alone with you in the office after hours.

Play it safe.Your potential bosses will probably accept that a rugby player will have the occasional facial disfigurement or broken limb, but tell them that you spend all your free time racing motorbikes or bare-knuckle boxing and they may worry about the amount of absence you will need.

Don't be a bore. Offices do socialise, and your future colleagues may not be happy about your abiding interest in lorry number plates or china animals. Write something like 'I am the life and soul of any party, known for my large collection of jokes', and you can guarantee your CV will go to the bottom of the pile.

So what should you put?

You need to show that you are sensitive, cultured and aware of the modern world, but not so absorbed in your outside interests that you have little time for work.

Try finding a field of study that is unusual but not obscure, plus perhaps interest in some exotic cuisine and one of the more novel sports or exercise techniques. In other words, reading, cooking and keeping fit.

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