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Feedback ignites unfriendly fire across the pond

webwatch

A while ago an architect from across the Atlantic wrote in:

'Mr Lyall. We would be grateful if you would consider our website for review We are an office with a broad range of experience and projects. We are very proud of our website and hope you feel it worthy of review.Thank you, Mr X.'

So I took a peek. It was hopelessly slow - and confusing when it did download. So I forgot about it. Recently I did an email clearout and the review request came up. A tad, but not a lot, guilty at not having replied, I sent this:

'To Mr X. Sorry to take so long to reply.

I'm sorry to say that it took so long for your homepage to download, even using ADSL - and then it was unclear what one was supposed to do - that I couldn't in all conscience comment on it except negatively. Best, Sutherland Lyall.'

'To Lyall. Thanks for the reply, albeit four months later. You really should upgrade to a high-speed connection. It is curious that in over a year of positive reviews and feedback, you are the only one who doesn't like it. We are all entitled to our opinion, however, something is amiss with yours.Thank you, X.'

'To Mr X. Maybe the fact is that I'm using an ADSL line - and your site is as slow as it was when you first emailed.

Besides, you should sack your web designers if they can't do a basic thing like accommodating non-broadband surfers. There's a hell of a lot of the latter in the US as in the rest of the world, S.'

'To Lyall. On this side of the ocean, all businesses have high-speed connections.

Maybe you should modernise. Why don't you review Foster's site again, hot shot. Better yet, why don't you quit your big job and take up something seemingly more suited to you. How about fox hunting? X.'

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