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CRITIC'S CHOICE

REVIEW

In an issue of the AJ that spotlights the Weissenhofsiedlung in Stuttgart, it seems apt to mention another model housing development whose construction started 66 years later - the Prince of Wales' Poundbury near Dorchester. Not quite what Mies had in mind, though as Robert Cowan pointed out in his assessment of Poundbury on its 10th anniversary, its 'basic urbanism' could support development in 'a variety of styles, which might or might not draw on Classical or local vernacular models' (AJ 03.07.03).

But Cowan also picked up on aspects of Poundbury that made people 'uneasy', referring to the TV series The Prisoner, set in another model development of a kind - Clough Williams-Ellis' Italianate Portmeirion on the Welsh coast. It's this unease that surfaces in a new exhibition of photographs of Poundbury by Steffi Klenz (see picture), in which its manicured streets are as empty and eerie as the townscapes of Giorgio di Chirico that Aldo Rossi reprised half-a-century later. The show is at Photofusion, 17a Electric Lane, London SW2 from 2 June until 15 July ( www. photofusion. org).

Much more in the spirit of Mies is a new exhibition on two oors of The Lighthouse, Glasgow - Marcel Breuer:

Design and Architecture. As with all shows organised by the Vitra Design Museum, there's a strong emphasis on furniture and other artefacts, but Breuer's architecture is substantially present too, with models of many major projects, including the superb, formidable Whitney Museum in New York. Like Mendelsohn, Breuer practised briey in the UK en route from Germany to the US, and this work from the mid-1930s (with F R S Yorke) also features. The show runs from 16 June-27 August ( www. thelighthouse. co. uk).

This Breuer exhibition is timed to coincide with Architecture Week 2006 (16-25 June). Among the many other events planned in Scotland are a talk at Glasgow's Tramway by the artist Toby Paterson, whose paintings and murals make continual reference to Modernist architecture, and a walking tour of East Kilbride, including a visit to (what's left of) Gillespie, Kidd & Coia's St Bride's Church. Full details are on the national website: www. architectureweek. org. uk

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