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Clock watching, massive attack and speedy PDFs

I promised to report on Atomic Clock Sync from www. chaossoftware. com, which offers a really accurate clock to replace the Windows version.That is accurate not in the sense of the Microsoft clock whose random behavior can be unnerving for gentle souls. First of all it has worked accurately for at least a fortnight. Then I thought it might be an interesting test to pit it against a rival time application called AboutTime, which you download (also free) from www. arachnoid. com/abouttime/index.

html. After setting the latter up on another computer in the office I was modestly cheered to observe that the two were within a second of each other and more or less conterminous with the talking clock. More or less? You ask. 'Fraid that's the best I'm offering but it is a far, far better thing than Microsoft-time.

In this era of massive virus attack a couple of readers have asked about a new and, because it comes back when you delete it, suspicious file on the desktop. It is called ~ (that is Tilde although it isn't spelled out thus).

When you first notice it you immediately want to kneejerk out your heaviest anti-spyware/virus guns to zap it to death.But no.Remain calm.Apparently it is not worth bothering about. It seems to be an unforeseen side-effect of one of last year's Outlook Express patches from Microsoft which that company has not yet sorted out.

I see those PDF ads are running again on TV.So let me quote an alternative view from a cover disk from a recent Personal Computer World (PCW): 'Opening a PDF file often takes a very long time, since Adobe Reader is loading plug-ins. Most plug-ins are irrelevant and this program will automatically disable them?' You can download the latest version of Adobe Reader Speed-Up from www. tnk-bootblock. co. uk. This is the site of a truly grumpy 24 year old with very big feet who lives in Grimsby and loathes the place. I have not yet tried it but PCW does not recommend applications lightly.

sutherland. lyall@btinternet. com

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