By continuing to use the site you agree to our Privacy & Cookies policy

Bottom up, top down, slide left, slide right

webwatch

I can't remember who suggested I take a look at the website of Mary Thum Associates at www. marythum. com.Whoever it was has an eye for quality because this is almost an exemplary architectural site in the sense that it is simple, fast, clearly organised and has an elegantly restrained design based on much of the screen having a black background with text in white and images in neat borderless boxes.And there is not too much text.Economically, it makes use of your browser's 'Back'button - although late in the day I found 'Home'and 'Contact us'buttons hidden off screen to the right and below, in what is probably intended as expansion space for future projects.

I say 'almost exemplary'because there are two really irritating barriers to accessibility.Make that two and a half.One is the fact that the site is bigger than the viewer's screen: you need to use the scrollbar slider if you are not to miss out on stuff on the right.The other is sideways text.There is something of selfinfliction about the former because the practice's contact details are in the invisible far right column.

Maybe it was a problem because, at the time of surfing, I was using only a 17-inch screen - but I guess most potential clients don't have the 19-inch and bigger screens customarily used by designers and architects. Incidentally, although the type is of a readable size, you can't change it.Half marks off.

The sideways text is really irritating.Publishers put book titles sideways down the spine of books.But this is only because the spine is the sole physical surface of a book that is visible when they are stored, as they customarily are, in a bookshelf. It may amuse the practice that surfers have to suddenly lurch perilously in their office chairs to the right in order to read the site's section headings.

But it is a real pain in the neck.Otherwise a great site.

sutherland. lyall@btinternet. com

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment.

The searchable digital buildings archive with drawings from more than 1,500 projects

AJ newsletters