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Blowing his own trumpet and virus doom and gloom

Webwatch

I have been urged to take a look at the new site of RIBA presidential hopeful Richard Saxon, at www. richard saxon. co. uk. A web site about yourself has to be the ultimate solipsism.Although I couldn't care less who becomes top RIBA man, can I urge all Saxon's supporters please not to look at it. Sure, its design and structure are bang on and must be Saxon's own work, because he hasn't credited anyone.But its content belongs to the genre of those relentless circular letters issued every Christmas by families you met just once many years ago on a Greek ferry. I can't bear to say any more other than please start over again - with professional advice. Before you lot read this.Especially abandon that photo in fauxacademic robes and bonnet.And the treacley section headings. And - well, everything. But not, the 'Presswatch' section.Here Saxon notes grimly: 'It is one of the laws of nature that press reports are never 100 per cent accurate.This log will note errors and correct them.' Echoes, there, of much admired Downing Street spin.

I don't pretend to understand all that virus stuff but it has its moments. More than a week ago The Register (at www. theregister. co. uk) reported the cessation of MyDoom - and its replacement by Natchi, actually Natchi-B, sometimes known as Welchi. It attempts to destroy any traces of MyDoom on the infected computer and then downloads the anti-MyDoom patch from Microsoft's site. Nobody's worked that one out. Meantime new Doomjuice worms have been joined by the trojan Mitglieder-H which spreads on to computers still unwittingly infected with oldie Blaster.

Doomjuice uses the same access route as MyDoom on undisinfected machines. So, poetry really.

MyDoom, Mitglieder, Natchi, Welchi, Doomjuice and traces of Blaster all in one week. I'm off to buy shares in firms manufacturing old fashioned wooden messagesticks.

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