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A house clad with terne-coated steel

working details

In contrast to the solid brick construction of the Victorian water tower, the new addition two-storey house is of lightweight, finely engineered materials.

The first floor is a terne-coated stainless-steel-clad 'box' that is supported internally by a fullheight concrete spine wall and which rests at the west side on a brick boundary wall. The east and south walls on the ground floor are glazed with a curtain wall system.

At first-floor level the house is linked to the water tower by a glazed bridge; at ground-floor level a concrete bridge spans over a shallow pool.

The single-storey wall which forms the boundary on the west side consists of a brick outer leaf and a cast in situ concrete inner leaf. A clerestory window runs above the wall, separating it from the terne-coated stainless steel cladding above.

The concrete inner leaf supports a series of 60 x 140mm RHS posts which support the firstfloor wall. The terne-coated stainless steel cladding, with integral geotextile vapourcontrol layer and WBP ply sheathing, is fixed to battens and counter-battens; these are fixed, in turn, to a timber frame filled with mineral fibre insulation.

The internal walls are lined with plasterboard.

The roof is covered with a single-layer membrane; the roof structure spans between the RHS posts and the concrete spine wall and cantilevers beyond it to support the east roof and wall, so that no supports are needed for the glazed curtain wall on the ground floor.

The shallow pool is flanked at the sides with blue-black engineering bricks to protect the liner; geotextile sheet is laid over the liner for extra protection and it is covered with pebbles.

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