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Swedish vacuum waste system Envac withstands Sandy

Installed on New York City’s Roosevelt Island in 1971, Envac remained operational throughout the hurricane

Automated underground waste system Envac recently demonstrated its resilience to climate change during hurricane Sandy

Envac system-How it works

Envac system-How it works

While the storm crippled much of New York City’s waste collection, Envac continued to operate, disposing of 8 tonnes of daily waste from Roosevelt Island’s 14,000 residents. Thirty three waste inlets throughout the island permitted residents to dispose of rubbish which was transported to a central waste facility via underground tunnels.

The LEED Silver-certified Octagon building is one of the buildings connected to the Envac system

The LEED Silver-certified Octagon building is one of the buildings connected to the Envac system

 

Envac waste inlet inside the Octagon building

Envac waste inlet inside the Octagon building

In the UK, Envac has been installed in the first phase of the Wembley City project.

Future-proofing of developments should take into account smooth functioning of services in the event of natural disasters.  Envac claims to future-proof developments for the next 50 years.

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