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Alan Dunlop

Alan Dunlop

Recent activity

Comments (98)

  • Comment on: Revealed: AJ/Hoare Lea Bursary finalists

    Alan Dunlop's comment 15-Jul-2015 10:23 am

    Congratulations Anneli on making the final shortlist and good luck to all involved.

  • Comment on: Scotland’s 2016 architecture festival lands £400k funding boost

    Alan Dunlop's comment 14-Jul-2015 8:51 am

    Not every architect, Paul.

  • Comment on: Partridge's Chicago: My kind of town

    Alan Dunlop's comment 25-May-2015 3:25 pm

    Good list, but you missed Walter Netsch's Inland Steel

  • Comment on: Schools: What is the impact of austerity?

    Alan Dunlop's comment 11-Apr-2015 9:18 am

    Clever piece Helen. Concise. All you need to know, really.

  • Comment on: RIBA moves to scrap Part 3

    Alan Dunlop's comment 25-Mar-2015 10:27 am

    "Currently students enter practice with poor business and client skills and receive very poor pay in return". March Students of architecture are in my experience, clever, articulate, critically engaged and motivated by a belief that architecture can improve lives and be a catalyst for positive change. They may have poor business skills but leave university highly motivated and with the expectation that they are entering a profession with integrity, purpose and a clear artistic and philosophical direction. Instead, are more likely to find a profession that is currently bogged down with issues of low fees/ low pay; value engineering, speculative work, meaningless competitions, BIM and supplanted by project managers, “key stakeholders” and accountants. The universities, not the offices, are where architecture as the mother of the arts is still practised, and ideas about place making, aesthetics, beauty and a willingness to experiment is undertaken, architecture and urban design discussed and critical engagement expected. It is practice that is letting students down, not the other way around.

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