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Southend Pier restoration and new train station by Saville Jones Architects

[FIRST LOOK + PLANS + PROJECT DATA] Saville Jones Architects has completed the £2.25 million revamp of Southend-on-Sea Pier – the world’s longest – after it burnt down in 2005

The scheme includes a mini-train station at the southern end of the Grade II-listed structure, which, along with the bar and emporium at the Old Pier Head, was also destroyed in the blaze.

The station will become the alighting point for visitors to a proposed outdoor theatre, one of a number of new buildings for the pier planned by Swedish practice White Arkitekter, the winners of a separate, high-profile RIBA competition earlier this month (click here to see scheme) .

Describing the design, a practice spokesman said: ‘The inspiration for the canopies is based upon the pattern of waves rolling in to the foreshore, and the uniform nature of each structure allows them to be economically produced and also dismantled if more ambitious developments are envisaged in the future.’

The zinc roof incorporates photovoltaic and the canopies will be lit at night from underneath.

Southend-on-Sea Borough Council selected the Worthing-based practice in 2007 to lead the design team in the restoration of the pier structure, which had to be kept open to visitors throughout the construction.

Client: Southend-on-Sea Borough Council
Budget: £2.25 million
Architects and CDM Co-Ordinators: Saville Jones Architects
Structural and Civil Engineers: Hemsley Orrell Partnership
Quantity Surveyor: Clifford J Emery
Principal Contractor: BAM Nuttall
Design team appointment: 2007
Project start date: September 2008
Construction completion: July 2009
Official opening: September 2009

 

 

 

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Readers' comments (2)

  • Waves again eh? I thought such gimcrack was frowned upon these days.... I had an idea once to make a football stadium look.....like a football.

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  • I was in Southend the other day, and I thought this structure was an excellent example of when function follows folly form. I got wet, there wasnt enough seats and the wind nearly blew my wife onto the platform. So what was the point of these canopies? Could architects design things that work, and not pointless forms that only exist to massage their 'design flare' ego.

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