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Architects Journal
16 June 2005

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  • ... AND LOSES A FEW FRIENDS

    LETTERS
  • ...RAISES QUESTIONS...

    LETTERS
  • 6A ARCHITECTS

    6a Architects was founded by Tom Emerson and Stephanie Macdonald in 2001 after meeting as students at the Royal College of Art in London in 1995. The practice produces work on a variety of scales, from product and exhibition design to large-scale housing developments. Its work for oki-ni on Savile Row has been recognised as a significant and innovative development in retail design. Current projects include a mixed-use development in Croatia, the conversion and extension of a former military b
  • 'a coherent approach that works equally well at micro and macro scale'

    Designed for rural locations, Sybarite's prefabricated houses offer views above the treetops and can be installed within two weeks. The underside accommodates undulating kinetic baffles, which are used to generate electricity.
  • 'a fascinating essay in manipulating the terrace'

    Paul Archer Design's proposal for terraced housing in Llanfair Discoed, Wales, is an attempt to develop a prototype for sustainable development in the countryside. The turf-roofed houses are sunk into the landscape to 1.2m, and the removed earth is then used to form a protective berm around the site. The terraces run east-west and are staggered, presenting the main windows to the south and to the sun. All of the houses are timber-framed and super-insulated with recycled newspapers. Photovolta
  • A GENERATION JUST AS TALENTED AND ECLECTIC AS THOSE IN THEIR PRIME

    Next week sees the opening of the AJ Corus 40 Under 40 exhibition at the V&A Museum.
  • 'a great use of material, very characterful - these buildings are talking to the public'

    Adam Richards Architects' competition entry for student accommodation at the Atlantic College in Wales takes the form of four three-storey, barn-like structures linked by a woodland path. Prefabricated bedrooms and bathrooms are plugged into in-situ concrete boxes, which are stacked inside the barns. A top-lit study bedroom runs the length of each building under the eaves.
  • A NEW CURVED ROOF FOR A HISTORIC TOWER

    WORKING DETAILS - MARTELLO TOWER
  • 'a radical reinterpretation of a much-neglected building type'

    Buschow Henley's design for a 400-inmate prison is a theoretical proposal developed with the Do Tank and Demos. The prison takes the form of 11 autonomous live-learn houses, each accommodating 36 people, with communal facilities below. The chequerboard arrangement allows secure gardens for each house. This limits the need for the managed movement of inmates, so giving staff more time to conduct the new regime of learning initiatives.
  • 'a triumphant resuscitation of forgotten space'

    Lynch Architects has been commissioned to develop a triangular urban public site near a supermarket in Balham, south London.
  • 'a versatile approach producing diverse sculptures. The organic shapes have a sense of permanence and strength'

    Mangera Yvars Architects' design for a mosque and Islamic centre in London's West Ham eschews traditional Islamic building forms in favour of biomorphic shapes. The complex can incorporate temporary inflatable structures, which refer to the tented structures used by Islamic nomads and will be used for peak festival periods. The structure is formed by overlapping ribs in an arrangement based on traditional Islamic geometric patterns. The project will incorporate photovoltaics, wind-turbine min
  • 'a witty and stylish approach to social architecture'

    Piercy Conner's proposal for the regeneration of Brooks Road Estate in east London is based on the idea of adding 'overcoats' to existing dwellings. These operate as environmental buffers, harnessing solar energy, collecting rainwater and reusing clean warm air, as well as providing additional usable space. Living rooms are reoriented to face the street.
  • ADAM RICHARDS

    Adam Richards founded his London-based practice in 2000, after working for Niall McLaughlin, MacCormac Jamieson Prichard, and O'Donnell + Tuomey in Dublin. To date, the practice has built a modern extension to a listed manor house, collaborated with an artist to design a miniature fantasy chapel, exhibited at the Royal Academy, modestly proposed a complete reorganisation of London and designed 50 shops. Its current projects include a stone house perched on a Portuguese mountainside, the compl
  • ADJAYE/ASSOCIATES

    A graduate of the Royal College of Art, David Adjaye started a small practice in 1994, and quickly established a reputation for reconstructing cafés, bars and private homes. In 2000 he reformed his studio as Adjaye/Associates with eight employees - the firm has now expanded to 35. In 2001, Adjaye won the high-profile Idea Store competition to design two new-build libraries in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. He was also awarded the commission to design the Bernie Grant Centre in Tott
  • AMIN TAHA ARCHITECTS

    Amin Taha Architects was formed in 2001 after its founders won competitions for urban regeneration in Manchester and a small theatre and arts centre in east London. Until recently it had just two principals, Anglo-Iraqi-Sudanese Amin Taha and Sarah Griffiths, but it has now appointed Richard Cheesman to the same position. Both Taha and Cheesman worked for Wilkinson Eyre, and Taha also spent time in the offices of Richard Murphy, Rick Mather, Lifschutz Davidson and Zaha Hadid, while Griffiths
  • ANNA LIU

    Anna Liu runs Tonkin Liu with Mike Tonkin.
  • AOC

    AOC was established in 2003 by a group of London-based designers who 'decided they wanted to ask the same questions'. Not exclusively concerned with architecture, they claim to be able to 'design you a home, write you a book or build you a city - or design you a book, build you a home and write you a city'.
  • ARB FIRES OFF SALVO AT RIBA AS PII WAR OF WORDS CONTINUES

    DAILY NEWS
  • ARCHITECT-ARTIST EXHIBITION PLANNED

    DAILY NEWS
  • ARCHITECTS JUMP IN WITH CONEY DESIGN

    NEWS
  • ARCHITECTS SCOOP GONGS IN QUEEN'S BIRTHDAY HONOURS LIST

    DAILY NEWS
  • 'architectural pop - the most delightful box of tricks'

    AOC has designed a folly for a film-maker overlooking a stream at the bottom of his garden.
  • BLOCK ARCHITECTURE

    Block Architecture is a London-based practice established in 1998 by Graeme Williamson and Zoe Smith. The practice works on a diverse range of projects, including bars, restaurants, apartments, houses, shops, hair salons, galleries and office space, as well as arts and exhibition projects.
  • BOOK

    The Iconic Building: The Power of Enigma By Charles Jencks.
  • BOOK

    David Adjaye: Houses Edited by Peter Allison.
  • BURD HAWARD ARCHITECTS

    After studying together in the 1980s, Buddy Haward and Catherine Burd set up in practice 10 years ago, working alongside Lucy Marston as directors of Burd Haward Marston Architects from 1998-2004. They recently reformed as Burd Haward Architects, adapting their method of practice to accommodate life with their two young children and to pursue activities adjacent to the business of architecture: teaching, writing, building and travelling. They have worked on a range of project types, from publ
  • BUSCHOW HENLEY

    Gavin Hale-Brown and Simon Henley have been working with fellow directors Ralph Buschow and Ken Rorrison since 1995 at London-based architectural practice Buschow Henley. The practice has won two RIBA awards, one for a residential project in Shepherdess Walk and one for offices for Talkback Productions, both in London. Projects won in competition include a scheme to regenerate 6.8ha of the Chatham Royal Dockyard to create more than 400 homes for Countryside Maritime, and the Performing Arts b
  • CÉCILE BRISAC

    Cécile Brisac was born in Firminy, France.
  • CABE PUBLIC DESIGN REVIEW PANEL

    AGENDA
  • 'canned energy, fit to burst'

    The Lock-Keeper's Cottage by Surface houses a £660,000 graduate school and research facility for Queen Mary's College in London. The new structure replaces a pump house at the junction of the local canal and Mile End Park.
  • CANTILEVER STAIRS HAVE NEVER JUST BEEN RESERVED FOR GRAND DESIGNS

    Cantilever stone staircases have been used in all sorts of buildings for more than 350 years. Russell Taylor cites Inigo Jones' tulip staircase in Queen's House at Greenwich (1629-35) as the first British example, 1 and William Talman's 2.16m-wide stairs at Chatsworth House in Derbyshire (circa 1699) as the widest ever.
  • 'celebratory engagement with the public realm'

    Phil Coffey's theoretical project for Glasgow combines an urban design proposal with a design for a new extension for the existing Tron Theatre. The public realm of the new theatre building is conceived as an extension of a promenade created by a new linear park. Outdoor rehearsal spaces allow members of the public to watch the actors at work. The project aims to link the much-neglected area of the Gorbals with Glasgow's vibrant cultural centre, the Merchant City.
  • CHINESE CITY DESIGNED BY BROADWAY MALYAN

    DAILY NEWS
  • 'community architecture without the earnestness'

    Harbinder Singh Birdi and Seth Rutt are working on designs for the New Art Exchange in Nottingham, the first UK arts centre devoted to promoting art by ethnic and minority groups. The building accommodates a gallery, studio and rehearsal spaces for both visual and performing arts. The architects will work directly with the Art Exchange's resident artists on aspects of the design.
  • CRITIC'S CHOICE

    When Mendelsohn and Chermayeff's De La Warr Pavilion at Bexhill-on-Sea opened, the Architectural Review (July 1936) said 'it gives us some glimpse of what a sensibly planned and seaside resort might be' - in retrospect, rather cautious praise for one of this country's early Modern landmarks. Now John McAslan + Partners is close to completing an £8m restoration of the building; above is the De La Warr's north face, patterned by sealant injections to protect the steel frame.
  • 'David's celebrity status is backed up by a really solid body of first-class work'

    Adjaye/Associates' 4,000m 2 Bernie Grant Centre in Tottenham, north London, is designed as a series of pavilions among a group of existing listed buildings, which include a town hall, a bath house, railway buildings and a depot yard. The centre will include a 300-capacity theatre, classrooms, dance and sound studios, a performance café, units for local businesses and a new public plaza that will connect the scheme with a local college. The project is due to start on site in August 2005.
  • DE METZ FORBES KNIGHT

    de Metz Forbes Knight (dMFK), formerly de Metz Architects (established in 1996), is a prolific, design-led, London-based commercial practice.
  • 'delicious, theatrical and beautifully detailed'

    Nissen Adams' competition-winning entry for a new theatre in Poland's Gdansk houses the theatre element in a solid brick facade but locates the foyer, restaurants and café in a structure that is more open to the city. The route between foyer and auditorium uses screen-printed metal, reflective glass and video screens to create a sensual experience that is deliberately disorientating. The auditorium itself is flexible and has a retractable lighting grid beneath an artificial sky.
  • DSDHA

    Established in 1998, DSDHA is headed by founding partners Deborah Saunt and David Hills, along with Claire McDonald, who became the practice's third director in 2004. DSDHA's portfolio includes 12 school and university buildings. The current workload extends from the redesign of Parliament Square, in collaboration with Foster and Partners, to a £27 million new education campus in Surrey and a private residence in Kensington Palace Gardens.
  • 'elegant use of materials'

    Bijaka, 6a Architects' project on the Adriatic coast of Croatia, includes shops, restaurants, fi lm facilities and 800 apartments. The buildings are arranged around a sloping courtyard, one end of which is open to the sea beyond a terraced park.
  • 'enigmatic and intriguing'

    Mueller Kneer Associates has obtained planning permission for this new church on a site occupied by a modest chapel owned by the Glad Tidings religious community in east London. The church and its ancillary spaces are contained within a single form, enveloped by a skin of large brass shingles in a reddish gold.
  • ERSKINE AND BYKER REDEVELOPMENT

    AGENDA
  • 'everyday materials and structures transformed into something magical'

    Burd Haward Marston Architects worked with artist Richard Wentworth and structural engineer Buro Happold on this submission to a limited competition for a pedestrian and cycle bridge at Bristol's Temple Quay. Designed to be 'inhabited' as opposed to simply traversed, the structure includes spaces for picnicking and lingering, as well as a central walking zone.
  • EXHIBITION

    Mark Dion: Bureau of the Centre for the Study of Surrealism and its Legacy At the Manchester Museum, Oxford Road, Manchester, until autumn 2006
  • FACILITY TO REVAMP DERELICT RAILWAY ARCHES

    London-based practice The Facility has won an international contest to transform the capital's neglected railway viaducts. The scheme from the Southwark firm to overhaul derelict arches around London Bridge was named as the winner of the 'Light at the End of the Tunnel' competition at a ceremony on Wednesday night (15 June).
  • FAT

    Fat is a London-based practice run by Sean Griffiths, Charles Holland and Sam Jacob.
  • FEAR OVER NEW SCHOOLS

    DAILY NEWS
  • FLIGHTS OF FANTASY

    TECHNICAL & PRACTICE
  • FOSTER HITS HOLLAND

    DAILY NEWS
  • FRANCESCO DRAISCI

    Born in Foggia, in the south of Italy, Francesco Draisci studied architecture in Florence where he co-founded the experimental design group Zoom Ahead, whose work was selected for the Biennale of Young Artists in Lisbon 1994. He spent four years with the Richard Rogers Partnership, working on a variety of projects, including the Skylight building in Frankfurt, the Millennium Dome in Greenwich and Chiswick Park.
  • FRANK GEHRY

    AGENDA
  • GANDHI SAVES BUNGALOWS

    Politician Sonia Gandhi has helped end years of concern surrounding some of the most important colonial buildings in India: the bungalow quarter of Edwin Lutyens' New Delhi.
  • GARETH HOSKINS ARCHITECTS

    Gareth Hoskins set up GHA, now Gareth Hoskins Architects, in 1998 after six years as an associate at Penoyre & Prasad in London. The Glasgowbased practice now employs more than 20 staff.
  • GLASGOW PLAN DIES

    DAILY NEWS
  • GRAY SUED IN SCHOOL ROW

    NEWS
  • 'grown-uparchitecture'

    Nestled in a back garden, this newly completed London studio by Sanei Hopkins Architects has raking glass beams supporting the glass roof and fold-away glass doors. It also has a sauna and steam room, one enclosed by a white-rendered, blob-like enclosure, the other concealed in a mirrored box.
  • HAKES ASSOCIATES

    Julian and Cari-Jane Hakes began their working collaboration having won their first commission in 1995, both aged 22. They set up their first design studio in a spare student room and fielded clients and phonecalls from a payphone in the corridor. In their final term at Cambridge University they won an open international RIBA design competition for 150 sustainable urban homes, prompting them to set up in architectural practice in 2000. Their first completed project, the Wycoller Visitor Centr
  • HARBINDER SINGH BIRDI / SETH RUTT

    Seth Rutt and Harbinder Singh Birdi run a team of 10 architects in their capacity as associates at Hawkins\Brown. They are currently working together on the transformation of the Grade II*-listed Park Hill flats in Sheffield, in association with Urban Splash. The Roald Dahl Museum in Great Missenden, Buckinghamshire, and the New Art Exchange in Nottingham represent the latest in a series of arts buildings developed in association with practice director David Bickle, where various themes of a
  • 'he has a real talent and is waiting for the right opportunities to reveal his full potential'

    Francesco Draisci's competition entry for a 'dream shelter' aims to provide homeless people with a warm place to stay. Hot air from the exhausts of underground ventilation systems is drawn into a large sack and used to heat a core room containing sleeping bunks. The structure is a standard scaffolding system. Cardboard tubes act as inlet and outlet ducts and the bubble is made from lightweight polyurethane foil.
  • 'highly evocative work rooted in the creation of sensual experience'

    Tonkin Liu's design for a 'singing, ringing tree' for the countryside outside Burnley is composed of 1,000 wind-powered fl utes.
  • HOK ABERDEEN PLAN SLAMMED

    DAILY NEWS
  • 'I want to be in that space'

    Fin-top House by Moxon Architects is a proposed solution to the way Tokyo's land prices and zoning are forcing people to commute long distances to work. Designed to be used singly or in stacks, it is suitable for locations such as unused car parks or gap sites. The pods contain two bedrooms, dining and living space, plus a creative play zone for children. The materials used for the structure and skin have been chosen to minimise the building's energy use.
  • IAN MCCHESNEY ARCHITECTS

    Ian McChesney graduated from the Royal College of Art before joining John McAslan + Partners, where he later became an associate.
  • 'incredibly self-assured for a first building - a wonderful example of 21st-century baroque'

    Brisac Gonzalez's competition-winning design for the Museum of World Culture in Gothenburg serves as an exhibition platform for the four Swedish ethnographic collections. The western side of the building, which is essentially a simple box, is the solid zone with galleries. The open east side faces over an adjacent hill, where public activities take place.
  • 'it's a delight to see an approach that is quite playful applied to a gritty urban context'

    The Hub is a competition-winning design by Andy Puncher and Andrew Hamilton at Hawkins\Brown for a civic and cultural centre in the former steel town of Corby. The project uses the language of a department store, presenting its services in 'shop windows' to an internal street.
  • 'it's refreshing to see something this bold within a conservation area'

    Gazzano House by Amin Taha Architects is located in London's Rosebery Avenue conservation area. An internal palette of stripped-down, semi-industrial materials contrasts with the arresting facade. The rainscreen of stepped Cor-Ten panels will oxidise, causing the appearance to change over time.
  • 'it's wonderful to see a building that you could never have imagined'

    Block Architecture was approached by the Magasin 3 Gallery to produce a conceptual design for the refurbishment of its annex gallery in Djurgardsbrunn Park in Stockholm. The proposal is to line the outside of the building with a fence of 4m-high timber posts that are mirrored on one side. The posts can be rotated so that the entire building reflects - and disappears into - the surrounding parkland.
  • 'lives, writes and breathes his architecture'

    Rob Gregory acted as client, contractor and architect on the refurbishment of Becket Hall in Bristol. The project is part of an ongoing crusade to revive historic buildings by campaigning and writing, as well as by direct action. The hall is set in a medieval courtyard among a group of old buildings, including a church and 15th-century merchants' houses. Long-term development plans are still in negotiation with the owners of the medieval houses and the Churches Conservation Trust, but this pr
  • MAGGIE'S HIGHLANDS OPEN DAY IN SCOTLAND

    AGENDA
  • MAKE POSTS WIN IN MAILBOX COMPETITION

    DAILY NEWS
  • MANGERA YVARS ARCHITECTS

    London and Barcelona-based practice Mangera Yvars Architects (MYAA) was established by Ali Mangera and Ada Yvars Bravo in 2001.
  • MARTIN EBERT

    Martin Ebert studied at Stuttgart University and practised in Germany before obtaining a master's degree from the Institute of Design in Chicago in 1998. During the summers of 1997 and 1998 he worked on design projects for several large corporations in Chicago and Hong Kong. In 1999 he returned to Europe and joined David Chipperfield Architects, and was made associate director the following year. Ebert now leads a team of up to 15 architects, with a workload ranging from private residential s
  • MARTIN KNIGHT

    Martin Knight was born in Brussels and grew up mainly in Buckinghamshire. He left school with 'not quite three A-levels' and spent a year working on construction sites before studying architecture at Manchester Polytechnic and the Polytechnic of Central London. He worked for Michael Hopkins and Partners before joining Wilkinson Eyre Architects in 1997 as project architect on the Stirling Prize-winning Gateshead Millennium Bridge. He was subsequently responsible for two other extraordinary bri
  • MICHELLE FAGAN

    Michelle Fagan trained at the Dublin Institute of Technology. She worked for OM Ungers in Frankfurt and Arge Hoger Hare in Berlin, before returning to Dublin, where she worked for Ahrends Burton and Koralek. In 1998 she founded FKL Architects with Paul Kelly and Gary Lysaght.
  • MOXON ARCHITECTS

    After seven years as a critical member of Wilkinson Eyre Architects' bridge team, Ben Addy established the London-based practice Moxon Architects in 2004. Its workload ranges from research projects to buildings currently on site, including Makkina Studios in west London, a lightweight reproducible bridge for use in Cairngorms National Park in Scotland, and the renovation of a large London townhouse into highly serviced studio and conference space for a car designer. The practice also provides
  • MUELLER KNEER

    Mueller Kneer Associates was founded in 1997 by AA graduates Marianne Mueller and Olaf Kneer. Mueller previously worked with Raoul Bunschoten/CHORA Institute for Architecture and Urbanism on urban proposals for Paris and Linz, and Kneer worked with Ian Ritchie on the Leipzig Glass Hall and with Llewelyn Davies on large-scale public and hospital buildings in the UK, Bahrain and Egypt. Over the past eight years the practice's work has included built projects, mainly in the UK and Germany, with
  • NORD

    NORD was formed in June 2002 by directors Alan Pert and Robin Lee, both of whom previously worked at Zoo Architects in Glasgow.
  • ONLY RECENTLY HAVE TECHNIQUES BEEN DEVELOPED TO JOIN TWO PIECES OF GLASS

    Glass is such a good structural medium that in the 16th century Galileo used it to test hypotheses, as did Griffith in the 20th century. But it is only recently that techniques have been developed to attach two pieces of glass together. Pieces of wood can be joined with wood pins hammered into holes that distort both the pin and the hole to ensure a perfect fit. The fit between the pin and hole needs to be 0.5 per cent of the diameter, making tolerance difficult without distortion. For steel,
  • ORDER IN COURT

    LEGAL
  • 'origami-like structures with an oriental sensibility'

    Fingal County Council commissioned FKL Architects to refurbish and extend the Baldoyle library and local area office. The new accommodation takes the form of a stone-clad, timber-lined, folded concrete tube that winds around the existing building. The sublime ocean views form the backdrop to the large first-floor meeting room.
  • PARRY UNVEILED AS NEW AA PRESIDENT

    DAILY NEWS
  • PATRICK LYNCH

    The son of an Irish builder, Patrick Lynch was born in Henley-on-Thames and studied at Liverpool and Cambridge universities, spending a semester at l'Ecole d'Architecture de Lyon. He worked in Germany for two years before returning to London to start Lynch Architects in 1997. Between 1997 and 2003 he taught at Kingston University and was a unit master at the Architectural Association from 2001-3. He continues to contribute to academic conferences and publications and is currently writing a st
  • PAUL ARCHER DESIGN

    Paul Archer grew up in Bristol and studied at Liverpool University before working for Architecton in Bristol and Tom Mellor & Partners in Preston. He left for Hong Kong in 1994, where he worked for Tonkin Design prior to returning to the UK to set up its offshoot, Tonkin Architects. In 1999 he set up Paul Archer Design. Its initial focus was on bespoke domestic architecture - enjoying the small scale and working with creative clients.
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  • PH4 AT HAWKINS\BROWN

    Andy Puncher and Andrew Hamilton met at Hawkins\Brown in 1998, and worked on various projects before being made associates in charge of a design team, PH4, within the practice.
  • PHIL COFFEY ARCHITECTS

    A childhood spent in large successful urban conurbations, including Liverpool, Bristol, Sheffield, Cardiff and Glasgow, nurtured Phil Coffey's interest in urban design and public buildings. He studied architecture at the Welsh School of Architecture, Cardiff, and at the Mackintosh School of Architecture, Glasgow, before joining Ian Ritchie Architects, where he worked on the Plymouth Theatre Royal Production Centre, the Spire of Dublin and the White City Project in west London. He claims that,
  • PICNIC

    This year's 40 Under 40 gathered in London's Russell Square to pose for the photograph on the cover of this week's AJ. The only absentee was Glasgowbased architect Gareth Hoskins, who, not unreasonably, chose to honour a long-standing arrangement to speak at an RIAS conference alongside Fumihiko Maki, Glenn Murcutt and Ken Shuttleworth. Our plans for an aerial photograph were momentarily scuppered when Rotterdam-based photographer Ari Versluis, whose work was spotted by AJ art editor Sarah Do
  • PIERCY CONNER

    Piercy Conner was formed in 1999 by Stuart Piercy and Richard Conner, both of whom previously worked at Nicholas Grimshaw & Partners. The studio's work covers a broad spectrum of scale and function - from Yo Sushi's Yotel sleeping-pod hotel to INREB, a new sustainable community. Its Microflat project has been the subject of several TV documentaries for the BBC, ITV, Channel 4 and, most notably, Panorama's focus on the future of housing. The studio, which is pioneering ideas in off-site manufa
  • PIPPA NISSEN

    Pippa Nissen works as an architect and theatre designer. Having read architecture at Cambridge and obtained an MA in theatre design from the Slade, she worked for several architectural practices specialising in theatre-building design before founding Nissen Adams with Ben Adams.
  • 'poetic radicalism'

    Hakes Associates' competition-winning design for a £1.6 million chapel for the London School of Theology comprises a 350-seat chapel, entrance building and link block. Daylight passes through long triangular openings in the facade in order to create a soft, diffused, reflective light within the chapel.
  • PROJECT ORANGE

    'Orange' was formed in 1992 as a loose collaboration of young architects committed to evolving design ideas through competitions and the exploration of new modes of practice. In 1997 a new company was established, Project Orange, by Christopher Ash and James Soane. Today, Project Orange is a professional studio operating out of London's Clerkenwell. Its projects include apartments, one-off houses and a new art-andtechnology block for Oakham School, as well as interiors for hotels, restaurants
  • PROJECTS UP FOR AWARDS

    DAILY NEWS
  • RIBA/EVENING STANDARD HOMES AND PROPERTY DEBATE

    AGENDA
  • ROB GREGORY

    Rob Gregory joined Feilden Clegg Architects after graduating from the University of Bath in 1996 with first-class honours. In 1998 he moved to Michael Hopkins and Partners, where he spent three years working on Manchester City Art Gallery. Toward the end of this period, Gregory's master's thesis, Liberation: the Spirit of the Festival of Britain, was published in the Architectural Review, leading him to pursue work as a freelance journalist, writing technical and building-study features for a
  • SANEI HOPKINS ARCHITECTS

    Both partners in the Sanei Hopkins studio are scions of distinguished architectural families.
  • SCHOOL KITCHENS EXPANDED

    DAILY NEWS
  • 'sculptural without being gratuitously gestural'

    Ian McChesney's design for a pavilion for Preston's Avenham Park will be the centrepiece of a Heritage Lottery funded scheme to revive parkland designed in the 1860s by noted landscape designer Edward Milner. The brief called for a classroom, WCs, a rangers' base and a performance space. The site is in a saucer-like depression, with the roof form particularly important. A forest of raking slender columns supports a series of roofs that fan out across the site.
  • SELINA MASON

    AGENDA
  • 'sensitive and highly accomplished'

    St John's College, Cambridge, has commissioned 5th Studio to design a graduate hostel. Working with two listed Georgian houses, a former joinery workshop and an existing garden, the practice has created 15 study bedrooms in a dense courtyard arrangement. A new in-situ concrete block will accommodate many of the students, while visiting scholars will stay in the original house. The new block will be lined in ply, and the rough-timber workshop will be lined with fine timber joinery.
  • SHOT OUT OF AN EDUCATION SYSTEM DRUNK ON DESIGN AND QUICK-FIRE PROJECTS, WE LAND STRAIGHT INTO THE REALITIES OF PRACTICE

    OPINION
  • 'slick, low-key and beautifully executed'

    The design and development of the Ernsting Service Centre at Coesfeld-Lette, Germany, was overseen by Martin Ebert of David Chipperfield Architects.
  • 'spaces that work at both child and adult scale'

    The John Perry Nursery in Dagenham by DSDHA takes inspiration from protected garden environments such as the Barbara Hepworth studio and garden in St Ives, Cornwall. Conceived as a 'studio for children', the building forms the fourth wall of an existing courtyard and has both outdoor and indoor teaching areas. Polycarbonate walls contribute to the studio feel.
  • SPONSOR'S FOREWORD

    INTRODUCTION
  • SPRINGETT MACKAY

    Matthew Springett established himself as a sole practitioner in 1998 following a number of private commissions in London and Ireland.
  • STAFFORD CRITCHLOW

    After a year working for Stephen Bayley on design exhibitions at the V&A's Boilerhouse project, Stafford Critchlow studied architecture at Newcastle University, graduating with a double first. He finished his diploma with a year at Venice University studying under Aldo Rossi. Having worked for Gaul Associates in Chicago and for Skidmore Owings & Merrill, he joined Chris Wilkinson Architects in 1992.
  • STARCK JOINS LEEDS SCHEME

    DAILY NEWS
  • SURFACE

    Surface was formed by Richard Scott in 1996 in collaboration with philosopher Jeremy Weate and architect Kristen Whittle. Andy MacFee joined the practice as a director in 2001. Surface's first project 'Soft-space' won first prize in the Shinkenchiku-Sha Residential Design Award in Japan, and 'Aquaphilia' was one of the 'Ideal Rooms' exhibited at the RIBA in 1997. In 1999 Surface won a competition for the headquarters of new media company Razorfish, which was followed by a £6 million comm
  • SYBARITE

    Born in Exeter, and the son of a watercolour artist and a seamstress, Simon Mitchell grew up in a creative home environment. His passion for architecture was evident at the age of nine, when he won the South-West Schools' competition to design a 'house of the future'. As a student in architecture, he took a keen interest in the works of architects such as Aldo van Eyck, Charles Eames, Pierre Chareau and Jan Kaplicky. After the final year of his diploma in architecture at Greenwich University,
  • 'tackling complex education issues with maturity'

    The Centre for Lifelong Learning is one of two projects for London's City and Islington College carried out under the guidance of Stafford Critchlow at Wilkinson Eyre. A radical reworking of a Victorian board school, the college has a strong new identity in the form of a new entrance and atrium, with the much-loved Victorian building at its heart. The scheme was shortlisted for the Prime Minister's Better Public Building Award in 2004.
  • THE NEW AJ FINDS FAVOUR...

    LETTERS
  • THE STELLAR CAREERS OF MANY OF THE PAST WINNERS HAVE GIVEN THE 40 UNDER 40 EVENT LEGENDARY STATUS

    Twenty years have passed since the RIBA held its first exhibition of the 40 most promising architects under 40 years of age.
  • 'the use of pattern and texture is popular, but will have longevity. It's funny how it's radical to use decoration these days'

    de Metz Forbes Knight's proposal for a 350-seat synagogue in Golders Green takes the form of a top-lit plinth building with a rooftop garden for al fresco weddings. The filigree pattern of the enclosing wall is generated from the timber tracery in the ceiling of the old synagogue at Przedborz, Poland, which was built in the 18th century and burned by the Nazis in 1939.
  • 'the work is resolved with great delicacy and eloquence'

    The Bridge of Aspiration, executed by Martin Knight of Wilkinson Eyre, links the Royal Opera House to the Royal Ballet School.
  • 'these early projects show great promise and we want to see more'

    Springett Mackay's two-storey mews house in London's Primrose Hill is located on a split-level site and is stepped back from the street in line with adjacent buildings. The back of the building has clerestory lights for the ground-floor room, with the first floor cantilevering over it.
  • 'they create very inhabitable environments and are able to address highly complex issues at a human scale'

    Witherford Watson Mann's design for social housing for the over-50s in Gistel, Belgium, arranges 12 apartments and a café around a courtyard. The housing is organised on two levels. To maximise privacy, ground-floor living areas are oriented to the rear, while those on the first floor face the front.
  • 'this work has an eerie quality that I think just might be the aesthetic of the future'

    Project Orange has converted a two-flat, four-storey house in central London into a single dwelling. The result is a collage of contrasting materials. A new flight of cast pink terrazzo steps lead to an oak front door.
  • TOM HOLBROOK

    Tom Holbrook claims to have fallen into an architectural career 'by a mixture of coincidence and moments where I have been lucky enough to be inspired by others'. He started his working life in the local theatre, acting as a flyman by night and a scenic carpenter by day, and went on to freelance as a prop-maker for various film productions. His decision to join the interior design course at Kingston Polytechnic was prompted by the realisation that all key decisions were taken by the art depar
  • 'vernacular architecture with a gritty edge'

    NORD has gained planning permission for 10 new dwellings at Havelock Street Mews in Glasgow's West End.
  • WE ALL HAD A WONDERFUL VENEER OF BRAVADO - BUT EVERYBODY WAS RACKED WITH DOUBT

    HISTORY
  • WE BELIEVE IT WILL RESULT IN A SENSITIVE PROJECT THAT ALSO RESPECTS THE SETTING

    WORKING DETAILS - MARTELLO TOWER
  • 'we must never ignore the mavericks'

    Fat's design for Heerlijkheid Hoogvliet, a recreation park on the northern outskirts of a suburb of Rotterdam, was informed by extensive consultations with local residents. The scheme includes a central building called The Villa for events ranging from weddings to Antillean dance parties. The park will have a swimming lake, sports facilities, barbecue spots, hobby huts, an arboretum and a pet cemetery.
  • WHEN THE CHIPS ARE DOWN

    WEBWATCH
  • WILLIAMS IN DANISH COMPETITION

    DAILY NEWS
  • WINNING DESIGNS

    AGENDA
  • WITHERFORD WATSON MANN ARCHITECTS

    Stephen Witherford, Christopher Watson and William Mann studied together in 1991 in their fifth year at Cambridge University. They started collaborating informally in 1997 and set up Witherford Watson Mann Architects in 2001 after winning Europan 6 for Peckham, south London.
  • 'work that is genuinely world-class'

    Gareth Hoskins Architects' design for the new Culloden Battlefield Museum building is part of a strategy for a 65ha site that includes transport, arrival and visitor facilities. The design incorporates long brick walls that blend into the landscape, and the centre has a roof redolent of a flat fan, with the outer corners of each section tilting up sharply, almost like the edge of a tam-o'-shanter hat.
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